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Home / Articles / Food / Food Writing /  Puppy Chow
Food2
Canine critic Bebe laps up the to-buck cups of probiotic goodness.
Kelli Bailey

Puppy Chow

Yoberri and Madrid’s the Hollar offer “canine cuisine”

November 6, 2012, 10:00 pm

Pampered Santa Fe pooches can now join the afterschool crowd that gathers daily at Ellie’s Yoberri Park (325 W San Francisco St., 995-9911). 

While their owners indulge in the classic tart frozen yogurt, topped with sweet “extras,” canine snackers get to lap up two-buck cups of probiotic goodness made especially for dogs in New Hampshire, under the Yöghund brand. 

Bebe was my canine critic at Yoberri one recent afternoon, tasting all four flavors that Yöghund blends.
Each cup comes prepackaged, and two of the flavors are organic. 

Yöghund launched at Yoberri after the husband and wife who run the shop found themselves regularly swirling tiny sample cups of the house-made yogurt into treats for customers’ dogs. 

A little online research led to Yöghund and, soon, Yoberri was doling out an organic banana and peanut butter blend ($2.30), a papaya-peanut butter combo ($1.90), an all-natural apple and cheddar recipe ($1.90) and an organic blueberry and vanilla bean pot ($2.30). 

Bebe rejected the fruit and vanilla blend, but scooted the cup of potassium-rich papaya peanut butter all over the floor, enthusiastically licking every last drop.  

Her second favorite was the more straightforward banana and peanut butter, billed as having beneficial “prebiotic inulin and antioxidants, plus live and active yogurt cultures.” Bebe tucked into it after polishing off the first bowl—though devouring both cups in a single sitting probably isn’t recommended, according to Yoberri’s management. 

As if two treats weren’t quite enough, Bebe started in on the cheese and apple juice-based concoction, but didn’t growl or complain when it was taken away—a sign she was sated. 

Yoberri’s management notes that all Yöghund flavors boast a good-for-the-gut mention on the label, providing a mega-dose of probiotics for pooch. But the sweet treats really are just that—treats—offering dogs as much of an indulgence as Yoberri’s yogurt gives to their human counterparts.

Dogs in Madrid might not travel all the way to Santa Fe for a snack, but regulars to the Hollar Restaurant (2849 Hwy. 14, Madrid, 471-4821)—a community hotspot owned and operated by chef Josh Novak—know that the casual, Southern-fusion dining location has always welcomed Fido outside on the patio. Now, lucky dogs dining with their owners at the Southern-bred, Cordon Bleu-trained chef’s restaurant no longer have to hustle table scraps. 

Novak and his fiancée, Chelsea, developed a full-blown dog menu as part of their fourth anniversary celebration. 

“It’s really a way for the restaurant to give back to the community,” explains front-of-the-house manager Catherine Hyde. “The dog food will be prepared fresh in the kitchen with a build-a-menu format.” 

Items for pooch begin with a simple dog biscuit priced at 25 cents. The idea is to add on from there, layering gravy, rice, meat and bones à-la-carte style.  

Plus, regular canine customers at the Hollar get their own personalized dog bowls, which hang at the ready on wall hooks outdoors.  

A benefit fundraiser for Special Ops Inc., the canine search and rescue nonprofit, marked the dog menu’s launch the first weekend of November. 

Two-legged diners at the Hollar can always count on licking their plates clean of Novak’s twist on Southern home-cooking staples such as fried green tomatoes in a lavender béchamel sauce, slow roasted pork tenderloin, rich and creamy cheese grits or braised barbecue ribs. 

Rebecca Withers Chastenet is currently involved in a Kickstarter campaign set to document pop-up Airstream shops and cafés. Find out more at: t.co/MJrv2Vv0

 

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