July 30, 2014

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3 Questions with Diva la Fiesta

3 Questions   This is the first time that Mr. Z will be lettin’ in the general public inside his speakeasy, so folks will finally get to see him at his gloomiest.

July 30, 2014 by Enrique Limón

3 Questions

with Nathan Deuel

3 Questions Nathan Deuel has worked as editor for Rolling Stone as well as writing for The New York Times, Harper’s and GQ.

July 22, 2014 by Ian MacMillan

3 Questions With: Doña Hatch

3 Questions Many employees have come through the SFR door, but Doña Hatch has been a mainstay for 17 years. Putting the “senior” in Senior Advertising Exec., Hatch has been a loyal staffer and a constant, sassy presence at the mother ship.

June 27, 2014 by Enrique Limón

3 Questions

with John Hodgman

3 Questions Comedian and writer John Hodgman, known for his role on The Daily Show brings his quirky wit and sly style of humor to the Jean Cocteau Cinema on Monday, June 2.

May 30, 2014 by JP Stupfel

Book of Abraham

ABQ author presents latest

Art Features Everyone’s got a secret (or not so secret) love of fantasy and science fiction. I mean, what’s not to love? There’s adventure, compelling characters, elves, magic, spaceships…sometimes elves on spaceships. 

July 29, 2014 by Zoe Haskell

Tree’s Company

Colombian sculptor Miler Lagos gives discarded Reporter issues the art treatment

Art Features Standing at 14-feet high Miler Lagos' “The Great Tree” is composed of press overrun issues of SFR, the Santa Fe New Mexican and other local publications.

July 22, 2014 by Enrique Limón

Home in SITE

Two local artists take on prestigious biennial

Art Features SITElines: New Perspectives on Art of the Americas has committed to linked exhibitions over the next six years that explore the Western Hemisphere’s creative, physical and cultural wealth.

July 15, 2014 by Austin Eichelberger

Getting the Folk On

Face the crowd, find your treasure

Art Features Tickets to the Santa Fe International Folk Art Market sold out on Friday and Saturday, but shoppers and browsers can still squeeze in until 5 pm today.

July 13, 2014 by SFR

Gothic Graces

Dance invades Federal Plaza Park

Art Features Sketchbook in hand, Micaela Gardner has been imagining dancers weaving through the space, and it’s not only geographical inspiration that she’s been taking from the historic site.

June 24, 2014 by Zoe Haskell

Barrel Racers, Blood and Broncos

Rodeo de Santa Fe turns 65

Art Features From June 18 to 21, the 65th installment of the Rodeo de Santa Fe combines all the classic sports like bull riding with live entertainment, including music and comedy acts.

June 17, 2014 by JP Stupfel

Killer Serial

Heath Concerts has you covered all summer long

Art Features There is a ton to do with the upcoming Railyard Plaza Concert/Railyard Park Movies series; two ongoing events that are totally free!

May 20, 2014 by Alex De Vore

'It Ain't Ovah'

Black History Expo explores roots, struggles and glories

Art Features For Cathryn McGill making connections with past generations through folklore is the best method for people to take pride in the resilience of their ancestors, gain self-esteem and build confidence for the future.

May 20, 2014 by Peter St. Cyr

Where the Action's At

Where the Action's At: Today's the last day to catch the SFFF

Arts World renowned writer of the Game of Thrones series and Jean Cocteau Cinema owner, George RR Martin, leans against one of the rows of seats in his theater as a mob of actors, producers, critics...

May 04, 2014 by JP Stupfel

Flick Fest Underway

Santa Fe Film Festival continues through Sunday

Arts The Santa Fe Film Festival is set to run through Sunday with movies showing at the Jean Cocteau and CCA theaters.

May 02, 2014 by JP Stupfel

Second to None

SFAI program enlightens, two-and-a-half minutes at a time

Arts The Santa Fe Art Institute gathers a small fraction of artists-in-residence every quarter, and asks them to speak about their work.

March 25, 2014 by Zoe Haskell

Summer’s Ending

With another lurking in the wings

Arts When Charles MacKay, general director of the Santa Fe Opera, stepped into the spotlight Aug. 19 just before the final La donna del lago of the season, the audience gasped a collective uh-oh. Who’d cancelled? Anxiety filled the house...

Aug. 27, 2013 by John Stege

Robert Who?

Plus that avid uxoricide Gesualdo’s maddening madrigals

Arts “Well. I think they must have just about run out of Schumann.” And so went an overheard comment at the Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival’s Aug. 15 evening concert. The occasion? Number three of four concerts billed as “Years of Wonder,” each featuring Gesualdo madrigals, Mozart piano trios and, need you ask, chamber works by Robert Schumann.

Aug. 20, 2013 by John Stege

Oscar’s Fatal Attraction

A messy night at the Opera

Arts It was, for sure, Oscar Night out at the Santa Fe Opera last Saturday, e.g., the world premiere of Theodore Morrison’s anticipated work depicting Oscar Wilde’s last years..

July 30, 2013 by John Stege

Violetta Revisited

And a sweet start for ChamberFest ‘13

Arts Finally I get it. Five years ago I denounced Laurent Pelly’s staging of Verdi’s La traviata for the Santa Fe Opera as “spectacularly inept.”

July 23, 2013 by John Stege

Bravi Bellissimi

Thrills and trills at SFO’s Scottish play

Arts I nearly had to see a barber last Sunday morning to plaster down my perpendicular locks after a hair-raising premiere...

July 16, 2013 by John Stege

No Reserve

Interactive photography exhibit aims for perfect shot

Arts Diné photographer Will Wilson invites visitors of the Georgia O’Keeffe Education Annex to interact with his exhibit...

July 16, 2013 by Sophie Engel

Going Dutch[ess]

SFO kicks off 57th season with a bang

Arts When Much Ado About Nothing’s dim language-mangler, Constable Dogberry, remarks that “Comparisons are odorous,” he’s probably right...

July 02, 2013 by John Stege

Price Is Right

How one legendary actor championed Native American arts

Arts Valve From continued visits to narrating an early recruitment film and reading poetry students’ work on The Johnny Carson Show, Price would support IAIA in any way he could.

July 22, 2014 by Enrique Limón

In Loom

Newly minted gallery celebrates fiber arts

Arts Valve Frustrated by the lack of local exhibit spaces for tapestry, LaDonna Mayer decided to take matters into her own loom and transform her personal studio space into a gallery.

July 01, 2014 by Enrique Limón

Great Minds Pink Alike

Eric & Bill Teitelbaum on Bond, writer’s block and brotherly love

Arts Valve The masterminds of the Pink Panther comic strip will be in town on Saturday for a special retrospective at Chuck Jones Gallery.

June 03, 2014 by Enrique Limón

History, Developed

New exhibit delves into instant nostalgia

Arts Valve Jordan Eddy, Canyon Road’s Matthews Gallery’s director of communications-cum-curator goes through a box containing 50 or so found images to be featured in Familiar Strangers, an exhibit centering on vernacular photography.

May 13, 2014 by Enrique Limón

Something About Harry

Actor Harry Lloyd’s latest role is the bomb

Arts Valve Though history and fanboydom might remember otherwise, Viserys Targaryen is the true unsung hero of Game of Thrones. Think about it: Had it not been for him, Daenerys would have never married Khal Drogo and she wouldn’t have received that carton of dragon eggs as a wedding gift.

April 30, 2014 by Enrique Limón

Paper Trail

Sculptor Kevin Box’s success is written in the stars

Arts Valve Alongside Japanese honeysuckle, “Indian Magic” crabapple and beaked yucca, a new exotic species has blossomed in the Santa Fe Botanical Garden. It comes in the shape of 15 monumental sculptures by

April 22, 2014 by Enrique Limón

Her Daily Bread

Sam McBride is the toastess with the mostess

Arts Valve Rye, wheat, cinnamon raisin and beyond done in Sharpie, graphite pencil and ballpoint pen populate McBride’s artistic breadbasket.

April 15, 2014 by Enrique Limón

On Key

New Railyard public art project is simply grand

Arts Valve Seventeen-year-old CJ Andrews has a vision for the Railyard. It involves artist-embellished pianos that anyone can come up to and tickle.

April 08, 2014 by Enrique Limón

¡Ajúa!

Metalachi’s road to fame is paved with Selena, boobs and “love juice”

Arts Valve Vega De La Rockha sounds harsh. It’s 1 pm on a Thursday, and he’s just rolling out of a motel bed somewhere in the outskirts of Austin. “It was a crazy night last night, man,” De La Rockha says.

April 01, 2014 by Enrique Limón

Filmed in Stereo

Crowdfunding project aims to illustrate, educate

Arts Valve A documentary in the works titled This is a Stereotype is slated to address head on “the misunderstanding and perpetuation of stereotypical myths.” 

March 25, 2014 by Enrique Limón

Press, Released

The Press at the Palace of the Governors kicks off weeklong celebration

Book Reviews Tom Leech, curator of the Press at the Palace of the Governors, is a busy man. “I’ve worked here for 11 years, and I’ve never had two days that were the same,” he says.

Jan. 15, 2013 by Robert Sobel

Absolutely Modern

Local independent bookstores, alive and well

Book Reviews When you come into contact with people who truly love what they do, their energy can be contagious. Such is the case with Nick Potter, owner of Nicholas Potter Bookseller, and Noemi de Bodisco and Sierra Logan of Op.Cit. Books.

Dec. 18, 2012 by Robert Sobel

Boats, Bikes and Blades

A man’s journey around the world

Book Reviews Circumnavigation: Magellan did it in a boat. John Glenn did it in a spaceship. Hell, Phileas Fogg even did it in a hot air balloon in the film Around the World in 80 Days (though, strangely enough, not in the novel on which it was based).

Nov. 13, 2012 by Ryan Collett

Middle of Nowhere

One man’s spiritual journey takes him all the way to Santa Fe

Book Reviews A priest who escaped from Nazi Germany, Father John accepts an assignment to travel to Santa Fe around the time of his grandmother’s death, which symbolizes the loss of everything he knows and loves. However, tragedy is not the focus of Gil Sanchez’ Viva Cristo Rey, and neither is history. Instead, the book offers a sentimental view of the conception of the Cristo Rey Church, the largest adobe structure in the northern hemisphere.

May 23, 2012 by Jackson Larson, Matthew Irwin

Freud or Fiction?

Cowboys, Crime Novels and the CIA

Book Reviews Michael McGarrity is a former deputy sheriff for Santa Fe County. For the release of his 13th novel, titled Hard Country: A Novel of the Old West, he asked Valerie Plame Wilson, a former CIA Operations Officer and author of Fair Game: My Life as a Spy, My Betrayal by the White House to interview him at Collected Works Bookstore.

May 09, 2012 by Jackson Larson

A New Home in Imagination

Native daughter brings Santa Fe experiences to Holocaust tale

Book Reviews Ramona Ausubel has found a way to let a story breathe while also giving great specificity to language—a rare trait among new authors.

Feb. 28, 2012 by Sara Malinowski

The Swedish West

Beautifully designed, photographed, written book misses opportunity

Book Reviews Promising to discover how people really live in our nation’s highly symbolic, deeply mythologized frontier, two Swedes venture to the American West with pen and camera.

Jan. 31, 2012 by Matthew Irwin

Undoing the Myth

Writer-director John Sayles discusses a career on the fringe

Book Reviews Take the US annexation of the Philippines. Around 1898, the US touted itself as an anti-imperialist nation, home of equality, but then it invaded a foreign nation under the auspices of white Christian duty: Save the heathen islanders. This, according to John Sayles, who visits Santa Fe to talk about his work, including the book A Moment in the Sun.

Jan. 17, 2012 by Matthew Irwin

Get off the Lawn

New book looks at the transformation of New Mexico’s plazas

Book Reviews Visit Santa Fe’s Plaza on any Saturday afternoon, and a diverse throng of locals and tourists, buskers and gawkers, buyers and sellers, and artists and lunch-eaters will be milling in and around it.

Nov. 16, 2011 by Hunter Riley

Girly Bits

Eve Ensler brings teen monologues to Santa Fe

Book Reviews In 1998, Eve Ensler published The Vagina Monologues, and suddenly a word that many viewed as vulgar became a powerful—and positive—force. This year’s V-Day performance in Santa Fe—a performance of Ensler’s new collection of monologues, I am an Emotional Creature: The Secret Life of Girls Around the World—benefits the Santa Fe Mountain Center.

Feb. 17, 2010 by Charlotte Jusinski

Getting Dedicated

SFCMF @42

Classical What more appropriate opening for the Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival’s 42nd season than Robert Schumann’s ecstatic song, “Widmung,” (“Dedication”) as transcribed for piano by Liszt? 

July 29, 2014 by John Stege

Enthusiasm, Thy Name Is Neikrug

Classical Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival’s long-time artistic director, Marc Neikrug, talks about the 2014 season, opening July 20 at St. Francis Auditorium.

July 15, 2014 by John Stege

A Brilliant Sun

Worth the journey

Opera With permission, let me gently misapply the term to the mysterious beginnings of Huang Ruo’s first opera, Dr. Sun Yat-sen, whose American premiere just happened at the Santa Fe Opera.

July 29, 2014 by John Stege

SFO Gets The Bird

A deuce of an evening

Opera Expectations ran high about this new, bright-idea Mozart/Stravinsky pairing, both composers with long-standing connections with the SFO, and both captivating works with the potential to provide another enchanted evening.

July 22, 2014 by John Stege

Heil Dir, Ludwig!

Nazis face the music

Opera The Santa Fe Opera’s summer of ’14 shapes up to be peculiarly political.

July 14, 2014 by John Stege

Absurdly Entertaining

Come on, get happy

Opera Director Laurent Pelly takes a long, unsentimental look at Don Pasquale and sees a hard-boiled comedy of trickery and deception, embellished with worldly wit and a spritz of cruelty, all packaged in a Donizetti score loaded with melodic genius

July 08, 2014 by John Stege

Sex, Drugs and Videotape

SFO’s Carmen Lite

Opera If there’s one thing that the Santa Fe Opera’s new production of Bizet’s Carmen proved last Friday night, it’s the power of positive projection.

July 01, 2014 by John Stege

SFO '14: So Many Operas

So few corpses

Opera These be precarious financial times for most US opera companies. The SFO can be seriously proud that since its 1956 founding, the company has never run a deficit. Ever.

June 24, 2014 by John Stege

Forgotten History

Uncovering the legacy of America’s all-black towns

Performing Arts Karla Slocum is an anthropology professor from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, studying the black history of Oklahoma as a local resident scholar at the School for Advanced Research. Think of her as a cross-country vagabond, but with a PhD.

Dec. 11, 2012 by Ryan Collett

Poetic License

Two poets diverge in a yellow wood (read: a local bookstore)

Performing Arts Last Saturday, Collected Works Bookstore hosted the second fall reading series of Muse Times Two, curated by Dana Levin and Carol Moldaw.

Nov. 20, 2012 by Robert Sobel

Like Mike

Yay! Comic Mike Birbiglia sleepwalks into town

Performing Arts With the success of his indie film Sleepwalk with Me, which he co-wrote, directed and stars in, it’s been a whirlwind year for comedian Mike Birbiglia; though he’ll be the first to brush off the “movie star” title. “My agent always tries to knock me down and say I’m not a movie star, but rather a movie starrer—which means I was the star in a movie, but I’m not an actual star,” Birbiglia tells SFR.

Sept. 19, 2012 by Enrique Limón

Children and Fools Speak True

Local theater collective dawns anew

Performing Arts A wise fool, says Devon Ludlow, managing director of Wise Fool New Mexico, is “one of those fabulous names…Jesters being able to speak the truth…idiocy and wisdom melding.” The medieval court jesters often interspersed truths, honest observations and wise words in their otherwise absurd performances.

Sept. 18, 2012 by Mia Rose Carbone

That’s All, Folks!

SFO and SFCMF bid adieu for the season

Performing Arts The acequia running nearby shows a few yellow leaves; too cool for breakfast outside today; the overgrown garden needs a firm hand. Summer is slowing and the summer music scene is finito. An imaginary curtain rang down at the Santa Fe Opera last Saturday night, and the Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival closed up for the year. So now—a little accountability?

Aug. 29, 2012 by John Stege

Tonal Voice

Schoenberg dominates Chamber Music Festival’s final weeks

Performing Arts Take note, please, of a preliminary event at last Sunday’s Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival concert: the sight of a large, black-clad man being tugged through the crowded lobby at the Lensic by a small girl. The child? A determined young daughter. The gentleman? This season’s distinguished artist-in-residence, Alan Gilbert. Her urgent excuse? I didn’t ask.

Aug. 15, 2012 by John Stege

Clarinets of Every Size

Woodwinds shine at Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival

Performing Arts Every time I hear a fine, well-produced contralto voice, I get the chills. Maybe it goes back to my grandmother’s old Schumann-Heink 78s. Kathleen Ferrier’s “Embarme dich,” and anything else s

Aug. 08, 2012 by John Stege

Straussian Function

Arabella continues a rich tradition of German opera in SF

Performing Arts Anyone who’s been hanging around the Santa Fe Opera for any length of time has heard, until quite recently, a really terrific amount of Richard Strauss.

Aug. 01, 2012 by John Stege

Upping the Ante

Chamber Music Festival: manic brillance, rhapsodic climax

Performing Arts Forty years old already? It can’t be that long since I heard several concerts at the Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival’s inaugural season—six Sunday afternoons back in 1973.

Aug. 01, 2012 by John Stege

A Thorough Rogering

The Santa Fe Opera’s King Roger stays focused

Performing Arts Ever since its 1926 premiere in Warsaw, Karol Szymanowski’s King Roger has been one of those conundrums of 20th-century music. Generically speaking, is it an opera? A dramatic oratorio? A morality play? Is it a work of penetrating insight into psycho-sexual complexities or a murky slog through mystico-symbological pretense?

July 25, 2012 by John Stege

Like the Wolf

JCC screening promises howling good time

Picks   “To see though the eyes of those in need is to inspire progress; only then can the inherent good in man reveal itself.” So starts Furthest from the Wild’s trailer.

July 30, 2014 by Enrique Limón

Market Daze

Make way for the 63rd annual Spanish Market

Picks The latest iteration of Spanish Market is here to cure your art market blues.

July 23, 2014 by Enrique Limón

ALL That Jazz

NM Jazz Festival boogies

Picks Should you be the type of person who hears the word jazz and thinks, “Man, I love me some jazz,” then the current New Mexico Jazz Festival might just be the summer plan for you.

July 16, 2014 by Alex De Vore

Piano Lessons

David Geist is here to school you

Picks Should you find yourself in the mood for a veritable smörgåsbord of finely executed show tunes, you’ll have a hell of a time working out a better solution than a David Geist performance.

July 08, 2014 by Alex De Vore

Once Upon a Time…

Veteran photog Steve Schapiro serves up poignant history

Picks More than 50 iconic photographs by LIFE veteran Steve Schapiro go on display this Saturday at Monroe Gallery’s Once Upon a Time in America.

July 01, 2014 by Enrique Limón

The Z’s Knees

Zozobra goes retro in special event

Picks Mr. Z’s Speakeasy, a party to take place on Saturday in commemoration of Will Shuster’s assignment of all rights of the giant marionette to the Kiwanis Club.

June 24, 2014 by Enrique Limón

Artsy Rider

Chimayó set to drip in art and lowriders

Picks Inside the folktastic Lowlow’s Lowrider Art Place, paintings by Arthur Medina representing everyday Chimayó life—virgins, lowriders, landscapes and more virgins abound.

June 18, 2014 by Enrique Limón

Rockin’ Rollers

Picks It’s a tale as old as time: A desperate young woman, fed up with the hum-drum day-to-day of life as a cat food cannery worker quits her job in a spectacular blaze of glory and runs off to join the roller derby.

June 11, 2014 by Alex De Vore

My Kind of Art Show

Judy Chicago’s New Mexico experience comes full circle

Picks Thirty years into her stint in New Mexico and coinciding with her 75th birthday, another landmark is placed in Chicago’s storied carrier: Local Color, a comprehensive spotlight on Chicago’s body of work since moving to the state, which unveils on Friday.

June 03, 2014 by Enrique Limón

In the Eye of the Beholder

Shan Goshorn’s art is self-evident

Picks Efimera, tradition and a new take on ancestral rights collide in the skillful hands of Shan Goshorn of the Eastern Band of Cherokee, as the concept-based artist presents her latest body of work, We Hold These Truths.

May 27, 2014 by Enrique Limón

Make Way for 'Manhattan'

Explosive new series debuts Sunday

Pop Culture Mark your calendars. Sunday goes down in history as the premiere of the TV program, Manhattan, about carefree twenty-somethings trying to make it in the big city. Wait, no, that was HIMYM.

July 25, 2014 by Ian MacMillan

NM's Comic-Con Connection

Artist Rick Geary Brings Billy the Kid to San Diego Comic-Con

Pop Culture Cartoonist Rick Geary is posing for a portrait behind his massive catalog of historical graphic novels at his usual spot at San Diego Comic-Con. Before I can depress the shutter button his head sudd

July 25, 2014 by Dave Maass

WGN's 'Manhattan' Trailer Analysis

Seriens premieres this weekend

Pop Culture There are at least two trailers out for WGN's show about New Mexico's own Manhattan Project, premiering July 27. Here are a few of the things you can look forward to in the show, according to the teasers.

July 23, 2014 by Ian MacMillan

Inside George RR Martin’s Own Wedding

The affair was quaint and neither red nor purple

Pop Culture If any lesson can be extracted from season three of Game of Thrones’ infamous Red Wedding and its purple counterpart, aired last night during season four’s “The Lion and the Rose,” is that George RR Martin hates nuptials.

April 14, 2014 by Enrique Limón

RIP, Ultimate Warrior

Iconic pro wrestler dead at 54

Pop Culture James Brian Hellwig, better known as “The Ultimate Warrior” collapsed yesterday evening while walking towards his car with his wife in Scottsdale, Ariz. He was pronounced dead at an area hospital shortly thereafter. 

April 09, 2014 by Enrique Limón

That Time Nirvana Played Santa Fe

Pop Culture It was the summer of 1989 and a little-know rock outfit from Washington, Nirvana, had just released their their debut studio album, Bleach.

April 05, 2014 by Enrique Limón

Top 10 Moments at the ‘George RR Martin Day’ Proclamation

March 29, 2014 is now officially GRRM Day in Santa Fe

Pop Culture The Iron Throne shone, George RR Martin giggled, actor Pedro Pascal game me the vapors and a sword-wielding Mayor Javier Gonzales officially proclaimed March 29, 2014, as George RR Martin Day across La Villa Real de la Santa Fé de San Francisco de Asís.

March 29, 2014 by Enrique Limón

15 Reasons Why New Mexico is the Coolest State

Pop Culture So what if we lack lush beaches and have modest adobe buildings instead of skyscrapers? New Mexico has character, dammit and we here at SFR would like to celebrate its quirks, warts and all.

March 22, 2013 by Enrique Limón

A Midsummer’s Midsummer

Side notes on a well-known Shakespearean comedy

Theater & Stage Reviews As a side note and perhaps to explain his decision to let his actors use their own voices in the Santa Fe Shakespeare Society production of A Midsummer Night’s Dream, director Jerry Ferraccio says t

July 04, 2012 by Matthew Irwin

Picking at the bones of industry

Other People’s Money appeals to hearts and wallets

Theater & Stage Reviews Director Ron Bloomberg leans over to me at a recent rehearsal for the Santa Fe Playhouse production of Other People’s Money, and says, “This is one of the first plays to address vulture capitalism

June 13, 2012 by Matthew Irwin

Company’s out for summer

Dance performance strives to push the boundaries of, well, dance

Theater & Stage Reviews Arcos Dance artistic director Curtis Uhlemann describes the scene for “46 Thousand,” a piece he choreographed with his co-director Erica Gionfriddo: The scaffolds are black, the dancers wear black (their hair down) and musician Andy Primm sits above them with his drum kit, playing a piece inspired by the John Bonham solo “Bonzo’s Montreux.”

June 06, 2012 by Matthew Irwin

The Performance Community

The Peñasco Theatre builds community on the High Road

Theater & Stage Reviews From the street-side of The Peñasco Theatre, where a folksy mural tells of people building their community together, the theatre’s owner Alessandra Ogren walks me to the north side of the building where a new mural by Rebeka Tarín and Amaryllis de Jesus Moleski offers a meta-response to images on the front, mixing folk iconography with urban-contemporary references.

May 30, 2012 by Matthew Irwin

Love Rocks

Musical reintroduces the anarchist Emma Goldman

Theater & Stage Reviews Love & Emma Goldman: A Rock Opera is about the enduring human voice. The original production by Sarah-Jane Moody and Jeremy Bleich (aka the experimental pop duo GoGoSnapRadio) is also about taking action for one’s beliefs. It’s about violence, justice, freedom and love. It’s about Emma Goldman, the turn-of-the-century anarchist who spoke up, was deported and disappeared into history.

May 16, 2012 by Matthew Irwin

Chasing Fortune

The absurdity of just pursuits in Teatro Paraguas’ Fortunato

Theater & Stage Reviews The cast is rehearsing the last scene of Fortunato when I arrive at Teatro Paraguas’ new location, a few units down from its old black-box space in the Agua Fría Village. They’re having trouble finding momentum. Lines are forgotten. Props are dropped. Cues are missed. And the scene comes to a halt when actor Marcos Maez leans against a giant target, only to have it collapse behind him with a rattling crash and the sound of glass breaking.

April 25, 2012 by Matthew Irwin

Oil and Water

Nonparticipatory resistance against corporate domination

Theater & Stage Reviews I caused the 2010 BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. This is my conclusion after speaking with Argos MacCallum of Teatro Paraguas about the company’s reading of The Way of Water, Caridad Svich’s play about four people affected by said disaster.

April 18, 2012 by Matthew Irwin

Worlds Within Words

Theaterwork realizes the works and lives of four women poets

Theater & Stage Reviews David Olson’s mother and grandmother were poets. At dinner, Olson’s father, a Swedish immigrant, would leave a line of poetry under a dinner plate for Olson or one of his siblings to discover and

Feb. 14, 2012 by Matthew Irwin

Contemporaneous Celebrations

Wake up and happy birthday, music scene!

Theater & Stage Reviews Santa Fe’s contemporary music scene awakens from semi-hibernation with two important concerts this week. And they’re all about anniversaries.

June 21, 2011 by John Stege

Through the Lens

Lensic affiliates share their views

Theater & Stage Reviews The Lensic theater space turns 80 this year and simultaneously celebrates 10 years since it became the nonprofit Lensic Performing Arts Center. The Lensic marks this milestone with the same varied arsenal of events it has wielded throughout its history.

April 13, 2011 by Rani Molla
 
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