Oct. 28, 2016

3 Questions

with Kasandra M

3 Questions When did you know you were psychic? I don’t like to say psychic, because I think there’s a weird stigma attached and people freak out when they hear that.

Oct. 26, 2016 by Alex De Vore

3 Questions

with Pamela Frankel Fiedler

3 Questions Artist Pamela Frankel Fiedler creates semi-nude, mostly black and white figure paintings that approach photo-realism.

Oct. 19, 2016 by Maria Egolf-Romero

3 Questions

with Dave Dictor

3 Questions Seminal punk band MDC’s founder/singer Dave Dictor’s life has been richer thanks to punk rock, and now he’s written a memoir full of stories and musings, trials and tribulations.

Oct. 12, 2016 by Alex De Vore

3 Questions

with W Nicholas Sabato

3 Questions Mr. Sabato  has  created lavish musicals, youth productions and beloved classic plays time and time again at the Santa Fe Performing Arts organization.

Oct. 05, 2016 by Alex De Vore

3 Questions

with Will Dyar

3 Questions Has everyone been enjoying the stream of the new Cloacas album, ...and the skies are not cloudy all day, this week at sfreporter.com?

Sept. 28, 2016 by Alex De Vore

3 Questions

with Gregg Turner

3 Questions In recent years we’ve given glowing reviews to both of the former Angry Samoans member’s solo albums, and the good news is that Gregg Turner shows no signs of slowing down.

Sept. 21, 2016 by Alex De Vore

3 Questions

with Victor di Suvero

3 Questions Poetry isn’t always easy to create or even to digest, but for 89-year old poet Victor di Suvero, writing the stuff isn’t optional so much as a weekly ritual.

Sept. 14, 2016 by Alex De Vore

3 Questions

with Fran Levine

3 Questions These days, Fran Levine serves as the president for the Missouri Historical Society and the Missouri History Museum in St. Louis, but up until 2014 she was the director of the New Mexico History Museum.

Sept. 07, 2016 by Alex De Vore

3 Questions

with Jess Clark

3 Questions On one hand, it’s a much better time to be a transgender or gender non-conforming person than in previous eras of human history, but there is still much violence, a serious ways to go and a lot to learn when it comes to being an ally or even a decent person.

Aug. 31, 2016 by Alex De Vore

3 Questions

with Rob Wilder

3 Questions Rob Wilder is many things: an educator, a humorist, an author; he even had a column in SFR for nearly 10 years. These many parts of him come together in his newest novel, Nickel, out next month from local imprint Leaf Storm Press.

Aug. 24, 2016 by Alex De Vore

The Arrivals

SCUBA’s Outer Local is a crossroads for New Mexico origin stories

Art Features “This was a play on the pop cultural references of New Mexico,” says Sandra Wang. “You know, pickup trucks and aliens!” At her feet is a little white box full of soil sourced from a streambed in La Cienega.

Oct. 26, 2016 by Jordan Eddy

The People’s Pottery

Smithsonian teams up with Poeh Cultural Center for homecoming and renewed study

Art Features Three years ago, Native art scholar Bruce Bernstein had an epiphany while looking at an antique picture. The image from July 25, 1903, struck the tribal historic preservation officer at the Pueblo of Pojoaque as significant.

Oct. 19, 2016 by Jason Strykowski

The Last Supper

Justin Crowe invites six living souls—and 200 spirits—to dinner

Art Features “Thank you guys for coming,” says Justin Crowe. “There are over 200 people mixed into a glaze and then covering functional pottery, which is the functional pottery that you guys are going to eat off of today.”

Oct. 12, 2016 by Jordan Eddy

Photo Set

Edition One brings Santa Fe’s diverse contemporary photography community into focus

Art Features “Photography is kind of an isolating field,” says Jerry Courvoisier. “You’re always in your own world and trying to produce your work.”

Sept. 28, 2016 by Jordan Eddy

The Realest

Robert Williams: A punk before his time

Art Features Standing in front of Robert Williams’ art is reminiscent of an awe-inspiring rock show; bright and hardcore, his work is the visual equivalent a guitar riff’s crescendo.

Sept. 21, 2016 by Maria Egolf-Romero


A newly local artist changes our perception on sci-fi and fantasy

Art Features Whether or not you realize it, you’re already intimately familiar with the work of French concept artist Stephan Martiniere.

Sept. 21, 2016 by Alex De Vore

Tag Team

Cannupa Luger turns viewers into collaborators at the Center for Contemporary Arts

Art Features Cannupa Hanska Luger arrived at the opening reception of his interactive installation, Everything Anywhere, in disguise.

Sept. 07, 2016 by Jordan Eddy

Swan Song

Dancer Samantha Klanac Campanile transitions to retirement

Art Features The career of a ballet dancer is notoriously short. In addition to injury, the demands of constant rehearsals and tours generally cause ballet dancers to hang up their shoes earlier than professionals in other dance forms.

Aug. 31, 2016 by Emmaly Wiederholt

Twice Burned

Burning Books sets its autobiography ablaze in new exhibition

Art Features Michael Sumner and Melody Sumner Carnahan recently put their house on the market and moved into a walkup off Cordova.

Aug. 24, 2016 by Jordan Eddy

Hi, Felicia

An artist featured at the Indigenous Fine Art Market on inspiration and identity

Art Features There is muse in melancholy, and it feeds Felicia Gabaldon’s work. “My style was born out of longing for home,” the young artist says.

Aug. 17, 2016 by Maria Egolf-Romero

SFR Cartoonist Russ Thornton Creates Official Artwork for the 92nd Annual Burning of Zozobra

Our very own cartoonist hits the big leagues

Arts SFR's MetroGlyphs cartoonist Russ Thornton designs the official poster artwork for this year's Zozobra.

Aug. 16, 2016 by Alex De Vore

Sculpting Trump

A look at how SFR's art director created the horrible Trump face for this week's cover

Arts We’ve been having a lot of fun at Donald Trump’s expense in our 7 Days section (and elsewhere), but this week’s SFR cover story was a little more serious...

Aug. 10, 2016 by Alex De Vore

Violet Crown Cinema Ready for its Close-Up

Santa Fe spin-off of the Austin-based cinema set for April 30 opening

Arts After much hullabaloo, the 11-screen Violet Crown Theaters are set to open the doors of the brand-new Railyard space on April 30. This after a private VIP reception scheduled for later this week.

March 30, 2015 by Enrique Limón

Ugly Sweaters & Season’s Greetings!

These are a few of our favorite knits

Arts Last Friday, SFR staffers donned their holiday worst, gorged on gingerbread everything and chugged spiked punch as if the world was about to end.

Dec. 17, 2014 by SFR

Skull Candy

Where to celebrate Día de los Muertos in style

Arts Día de Los Muertos is a vibrant celebration that brings people together every year to memorialize the lives of those who have passed. This weekend, two of the city’s biggest cultural centers offer activities, music and food to celebrate the holiday.

Oct. 31, 2014 by Luke Henley

Where the Action's At

Where the Action's At: Today's the last day to catch the SFFF

Arts World renowned writer of the Game of Thrones series and Jean Cocteau Cinema owner, George RR Martin, leans against one of the rows of seats in his theater as a mob of actors, producers, critics...

May 04, 2014 by JP Stupfel

Flick Fest Underway

Santa Fe Film Festival continues through Sunday

Arts The Santa Fe Film Festival is set to run through Sunday with movies showing at the Jean Cocteau and CCA theaters.

May 02, 2014 by JP Stupfel

Second to None

SFAI program enlightens, two-and-a-half minutes at a time

Arts The Santa Fe Art Institute gathers a small fraction of artists-in-residence every quarter, and asks them to speak about their work.

March 25, 2014 by Zoe Haskell

Summer’s Ending

With another lurking in the wings

Arts When Charles MacKay, general director of the Santa Fe Opera, stepped into the spotlight Aug. 19 just before the final La donna del lago of the season, the audience gasped a collective uh-oh. Who’d cancelled? Anxiety filled the house...

Aug. 27, 2013 by John Stege

Robert Who?

Plus that avid uxoricide Gesualdo’s maddening madrigals

Arts “Well. I think they must have just about run out of Schumann.” And so went an overheard comment at the Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival’s Aug. 15 evening concert. The occasion? Number three of four concerts billed as “Years of Wonder,” each featuring Gesualdo madrigals, Mozart piano trios and, need you ask, chamber works by Robert Schumann.

Aug. 20, 2013 by John Stege

XX Marks the Spot

Fair sex strikes back in new exhibit

Arts Valve Santa Fe-based artist Ligia Bouton's Understudy for Animal Farm parts from George Orwell’s dystopian novella and points the mirror back at the viewer.

Sept. 09, 2015 by Enrique Limón

Cue the Credits

It’s curtains for Casablanca Video

Arts Valve “Sold!” Casablanca Video owner Bruce Smith says in his best auctioneer voice as he dispatches a customer, who leaves armed with a bagful of DVDs.

Sept. 02, 2015 by Enrique Limón

Frank Buffalo Hyde

Arts Valve Onondaga/Nez Perce artist Frank Buffalo Hyde (b. 1974) sees Hollywood and the fashion industry’s attempts at appropriation and raises them.

Aug. 19, 2015 by Enrique Limón

Meryl McMaster

Arts Valve A Plains Cree member of the Siksika Nation who is also of European descent, the 27-year-old explored the topic of identity early on, along with perception, memory and myth.

Aug. 19, 2015 by Enrique Limón

Santiago X

Arts Valve A couple of years back, I became familiar with the art of Santiago X, which can best be described as equal parts transgressive and tongue-in-cheek.

Aug. 19, 2015 by Enrique Limón

Teri Greeves

Arts Valve Stackable plastic drawers filled with her “stash”—beads in every hue known to man—dominate the studio of Teri Greeves (b. 1970).

Aug. 19, 2015 by Enrique Limón

Jaque Fragua

Arts Valve “Jaque is passionate and can express his aims with his mural far better than I could,” Shepard Fairey says of one of Jaque Fragua’s monumental pieces.

Aug. 19, 2015 by Enrique Limón

Shan Goshorn

Arts Valve “Meticulous” doesn’t even begin to describe the work of Shan Goshorn (b. 1957). Rooted in advocacy, education and activism, the Eastern Band of Cherokee artist’s double-woven works tell a complex story of oppression, redemption and survival.

Aug. 19, 2015 by Enrique Limón

Steven Paul Judd

Arts Valve Specializing in pieces “for Indians to have, and that gets white people to think,” Kiowa/Choctaw artist Steven Paul Judd draws from the lack of mainstream Native American culture during his childhood and rewrites history.

Aug. 19, 2015 by Enrique Limón

Domina Effect

Enter the uniquely titillating world of Zircus Erotique

Arts Valve Even away from the lights of the stage, the feathers, the pasties and the catcalls, Mena Domina exudes seductiveness.

April 29, 2015 by Enrique Limón

As the World Burns

Thriller with a pedigree melds romance, comedy and a catastrophic threat to mankind … sound familiar?

Book Reviews We might as well get it out in the open right now, in case you are late to the party: Author Joe Hill is actually Joseph King—son of (prolific American horror heavyweight) Stephen King.

May 18, 2016 by Julie Ann Grimm

Press, Released

The Press at the Palace of the Governors kicks off weeklong celebration

Book Reviews Tom Leech, curator of the Press at the Palace of the Governors, is a busy man. “I’ve worked here for 11 years, and I’ve never had two days that were the same,” he says.

Jan. 15, 2013 by Robert Sobel

Absolutely Modern

Local independent bookstores, alive and well

Book Reviews When you come into contact with people who truly love what they do, their energy can be contagious. Such is the case with Nick Potter, owner of Nicholas Potter Bookseller, and Noemi de Bodisco and Sierra Logan of Op.Cit. Books.

Dec. 18, 2012 by Robert Sobel

Boats, Bikes and Blades

A man’s journey around the world

Book Reviews Circumnavigation: Magellan did it in a boat. John Glenn did it in a spaceship. Hell, Phileas Fogg even did it in a hot air balloon in the film Around the World in 80 Days (though, strangely enough, not in the novel on which it was based).

Nov. 13, 2012 by Ryan Collett

Middle of Nowhere

One man’s spiritual journey takes him all the way to Santa Fe

Book Reviews A priest who escaped from Nazi Germany, Father John accepts an assignment to travel to Santa Fe around the time of his grandmother’s death, which symbolizes the loss of everything he knows and loves. However, tragedy is not the focus of Gil Sanchez’ Viva Cristo Rey, and neither is history. Instead, the book offers a sentimental view of the conception of the Cristo Rey Church, the largest adobe structure in the northern hemisphere.

May 23, 2012 by Jackson Larson, Matthew Irwin

Freud or Fiction?

Cowboys, Crime Novels and the CIA

Book Reviews Michael McGarrity is a former deputy sheriff for Santa Fe County. For the release of his 13th novel, titled Hard Country: A Novel of the Old West, he asked Valerie Plame Wilson, a former CIA Operations Officer and author of Fair Game: My Life as a Spy, My Betrayal by the White House to interview him at Collected Works Bookstore.

May 09, 2012 by Jackson Larson

A New Home in Imagination

Native daughter brings Santa Fe experiences to Holocaust tale

Book Reviews Ramona Ausubel has found a way to let a story breathe while also giving great specificity to language—a rare trait among new authors.

Feb. 28, 2012 by Sara Malinowski

The Swedish West

Beautifully designed, photographed, written book misses opportunity

Book Reviews Promising to discover how people really live in our nation’s highly symbolic, deeply mythologized frontier, two Swedes venture to the American West with pen and camera.

Jan. 31, 2012 by Matthew Irwin

Undoing the Myth

Writer-director John Sayles discusses a career on the fringe

Book Reviews Take the US annexation of the Philippines. Around 1898, the US touted itself as an anti-imperialist nation, home of equality, but then it invaded a foreign nation under the auspices of white Christian duty: Save the heathen islanders. This, according to John Sayles, who visits Santa Fe to talk about his work, including the book A Moment in the Sun.

Jan. 17, 2012 by Matthew Irwin

Get off the Lawn

New book looks at the transformation of New Mexico’s plazas

Book Reviews Visit Santa Fe’s Plaza on any Saturday afternoon, and a diverse throng of locals and tourists, buskers and gawkers, buyers and sellers, and artists and lunch-eaters will be milling in and around it.

Nov. 16, 2011 by Hunter Riley

Calling It a Season

SFCMF says hasta luego

Classical Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival audiences could do the figuring-out for themselves at noon, Aug. 19, at the Lensic when Yefim Bronfman just about tore our heads off with his reading of Prokofiev’s fresh and fierce sonata.

Aug. 26, 2014 by John Stege

SFCMF’s Slow Wind-up

Mostly Mozart, magical Messiaen

Classical As these lazy August days dwindle, peak and pine, Santa Fe music-mavens can’t be faulted for feeling a bit sad that the crazy summer festival scene is nearly finito.

Aug. 20, 2014 by John Stege

The Music Goes Round and Round

Silence and riddles during SFCMF’s fourth week

Classical The other day an old pal recalled a little lecture delivered in this space a few years back. The gist? Will you audiences please, please stop already with those obligatory knee-jerk standing ovations? Save same for the real, rare spine-tingling conce

Aug. 13, 2014 by John Stege

Mostly About the Beethoven

SFCMF at work

Classical Those vigas and latillas and massive corbels in St. Francis Auditorium may still be vibrating after pianist Alessio Bax’s big bow-wow July 29 noon recital. At first glance his program looked a bit peculiar: Rachmaninoff and Mussorgsky

Aug. 05, 2014 by John Stege

Getting Dedicated


Classical What more appropriate opening for the Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival’s 42nd season than Robert Schumann’s ecstatic song, “Widmung,” (“Dedication”) as transcribed for piano by Liszt? 

July 29, 2014 by John Stege

Enthusiasm, Thy Name Is Neikrug

Classical Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival’s long-time artistic director, Marc Neikrug, talks about the 2014 season, opening July 20 at St. Francis Auditorium.

July 15, 2014 by John Stege

IFAM Booth & Vendor Locator

2014 Official IFAM Guide

IFAM The Official Guide to IFAM 2014 - Artist and Vendor Booth Map

Aug. 19, 2014 by SFR

IFAM Rocks

New Market courts a younger demographic while still serving everyone

IFAM If you’ve lived around Santa Fe for any real amount of time, it was no doubt surprising to hear that some awesome renegade artists were splintering off from the mega Indian Market to form their own event in the Railyard.

Aug. 18, 2014 by Alex De Vore

Letter From the President

IFAM IFAM is more than just a Market. It is a movement. It was born of a group of artists with a vision. We wanted a show where we could come together to share our stories, our culture, our heritage and our legacies with you.

Aug. 18, 2014 by John Torres Nez

New Kids on the Market Block

Five artists on the rise discuss hopes for their first market experience

IFAM Though some might have been practicing art for most of their lives, this collection of emerging artists talk about what they expect during their first market experience. Come up and see them sometime (at their booth, that is).

Aug. 15, 2014 by Ian MacMillan

Miles To Go Before He Sleeps

Douglas Miles plays by his own set of rules

IFAM San Carlos Apache–Akimel O’odham artist Douglas Miles has so many moving parts, it’s sometimes difficult to keep track of how they all fit together.

Aug. 15, 2014 by Rob DeWalt

Happy Monsters and Other Creatures

Enter the world of Heidi K Brandow

IFAM I am going to ask you a very stereotypical question,” I say. Heidi Brandow nods. “Were you influenced by the skater-surfer culture in Hawaii?” She smiles big, getting the subtle humor.

Aug. 15, 2014 by Bett Williams

So Long, Sixtieth

SFR’s Best Of . . . goes to the opera

Opera Yogi Berra, sublime phrasemaker that he was, advised anybody who’d listen that “it ain’t over till it’s over.” So readers, be aware: Santa Fe Opera’s 60th season ain’t over, and won’t be until La Fanciulla del West shuts the place down.

Aug. 17, 2016 by John Stege

Samuel Barber’s Wintry Tale

A new face at SFO

Opera Frankly, Mr. MacKay, it’s high time the Santa Fe Opera company got around to Samuel Barber and Gian Carlo Menotti’s looking-for-love-in-all-the-wrong-places opus, Vanessa.

Aug. 03, 2016 by John Stege

Ultimate Strauss

SFO’s Golden Hour

Opera It is a truth universally acknowledged that an opera worth anyone’s attention is in want of a plot. So it’s plot, plot, plot for three of the four operas staged thus far in the Santa Fe Opera’s 60th season.

July 27, 2016 by John Stege

Death-Mark’d Love on Opera Hill

SFO’s Shakespearean 'liebestod'

Opera To begin with, make the vital distinction between great operas and grand opéra. The former? A critical judgment. The latter? A stylistic definition.

July 20, 2016 by John Stege

Delivering Da Don

Mozart’s go-to-hell opus

Opera Want a cutting-edge, new-fangled take on Mozart’s Don Giovanni? Check out a few recent notorieties: the crazily dysfunctional family in Dmitri Tcherniakov’s version, seen first at Aix in 2010.

July 13, 2016 by John Stege

Pistol-Packin’ Minnie

Hellooooo, Ragazzi!

Opera When’s the last time you heard “Oh, doo-da-day” sung in an opera house?

July 06, 2016 by John Stege

Darling, You Don’t Look 60

Santa Fe Opera hits a big milestone

Opera It was 1957, just Elvis and Ike and me. I’d made my Metropolitan Opera debut a year earlier (Aida: Ethiopian captive). Now—a bitter July night during the Santa Fe Opera’s risky-ambitious debut season, seven operas that wet first summer.

June 29, 2016 by John Stege

A Nifty Fifty-Ninth

A five-star summer

Opera The collective shoulder of the Santa Fe Opera, closing down its 59th season on Saturday, Aug. 29, has borne a few heavy crosses this summer.

Aug. 12, 2015 by John Stege

A Magic Mountain

That’s anything but cold

Opera Perched on its hill north of town, the Santa Fe Opera doesn’t shy away from nouveau.

Aug. 05, 2015 by John Stege

Infinite Finto

Mozart’s troubled school for lovers

Opera Forget Mozart—for now. Instead, be diverted with thoughts of Jerome Kern. Of Oscar Hammerstein II.

July 29, 2015 by John Stege

Forgotten History

Uncovering the legacy of America’s all-black towns

Performing Arts Karla Slocum is an anthropology professor from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, studying the black history of Oklahoma as a local resident scholar at the School for Advanced Research. Think of her as a cross-country vagabond, but with a PhD.

Dec. 11, 2012 by Ryan Collett

Poetic License

Two poets diverge in a yellow wood (read: a local bookstore)

Performing Arts Last Saturday, Collected Works Bookstore hosted the second fall reading series of Muse Times Two, curated by Dana Levin and Carol Moldaw.

Nov. 20, 2012 by Robert Sobel

Like Mike

Yay! Comic Mike Birbiglia sleepwalks into town

Performing Arts With the success of his indie film Sleepwalk with Me, which he co-wrote, directed and stars in, it’s been a whirlwind year for comedian Mike Birbiglia; though he’ll be the first to brush off the “movie star” title. “My agent always tries to knock me down and say I’m not a movie star, but rather a movie starrer—which means I was the star in a movie, but I’m not an actual star,” Birbiglia tells SFR.

Sept. 19, 2012 by Enrique Limón

Children and Fools Speak True

Local theater collective dawns anew

Performing Arts A wise fool, says Devon Ludlow, managing director of Wise Fool New Mexico, is “one of those fabulous names…Jesters being able to speak the truth…idiocy and wisdom melding.” The medieval court jesters often interspersed truths, honest observations and wise words in their otherwise absurd performances.

Sept. 18, 2012 by Mia Rose Carbone

That’s All, Folks!

SFO and SFCMF bid adieu for the season

Performing Arts The acequia running nearby shows a few yellow leaves; too cool for breakfast outside today; the overgrown garden needs a firm hand. Summer is slowing and the summer music scene is finito. An imaginary curtain rang down at the Santa Fe Opera last Saturday night, and the Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival closed up for the year. So now—a little accountability?

Aug. 29, 2012 by John Stege

Tonal Voice

Schoenberg dominates Chamber Music Festival’s final weeks

Performing Arts Take note, please, of a preliminary event at last Sunday’s Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival concert: the sight of a large, black-clad man being tugged through the crowded lobby at the Lensic by a small girl. The child? A determined young daughter. The gentleman? This season’s distinguished artist-in-residence, Alan Gilbert. Her urgent excuse? I didn’t ask.

Aug. 15, 2012 by John Stege

Clarinets of Every Size

Woodwinds shine at Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival

Performing Arts Every time I hear a fine, well-produced contralto voice, I get the chills. Maybe it goes back to my grandmother’s old Schumann-Heink 78s. Kathleen Ferrier’s “Embarme dich,” and anything else s

Aug. 08, 2012 by John Stege

Straussian Function

Arabella continues a rich tradition of German opera in SF

Performing Arts Anyone who’s been hanging around the Santa Fe Opera for any length of time has heard, until quite recently, a really terrific amount of Richard Strauss.

Aug. 01, 2012 by John Stege

Upping the Ante

Chamber Music Festival: manic brillance, rhapsodic climax

Performing Arts Forty years old already? It can’t be that long since I heard several concerts at the Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival’s inaugural season—six Sunday afternoons back in 1973.

Aug. 01, 2012 by John Stege

A Thorough Rogering

The Santa Fe Opera’s King Roger stays focused

Performing Arts Ever since its 1926 premiere in Warsaw, Karol Szymanowski’s King Roger has been one of those conundrums of 20th-century music. Generically speaking, is it an opera? A dramatic oratorio? A morality play? Is it a work of penetrating insight into psycho-sexual complexities or a murky slog through mystico-symbological pretense?

July 25, 2012 by John Stege

SFR Picks: Dream Team

Get your dance on

Picks Kevin Barnes likes to dance. And the frontman for indie-pop band of Montreal’s kinetic affinity is extra present in the hip-shaking beats and ethereal melodic progressions on their newest effort, Innocence Reaches.

Oct. 25, 2016 by Maria Egolf-Romero, Alex De Vore

SFR Picks: All Grown Up

SF Botanical Garden reveals stunning second phase

Picks Santa Fe gets compared to other Southwestern cities in more ways than many of us find comfortable. But we know that when it comes to our scorecard of cultural amenities, we earn well-deserved top rankings.

SFR Picks: Adventures Across Time

The incredible true story of one woman’s quest for love

Picks As the warm outdoor season comes to a close into Santa Fe, a performance about an expedition across the steamy Amazon resulting in death, disease and a lone survivor is sure to satisfy anyone’s itch for adventure.

Oct. 12, 2016 by Alex De Vore, Maria Egolf-Romero

SFR Picks: You Say You Want a Revolution

Picks You may have already read this week’s cover story, wherein we learn that the small but dedicated Teatro Paraguas is on a mission to examine social issues and the underserved through the power of theater.

Oct. 05, 2016 by Alex De Vore, Maria Egolf-Romero

SFR Picks: It’s Lit

Eight weeks of local art

Picks The Santa Fe Art Project is a multi-faceted, eight-week-long exhibition and collaborative effort between emerging and established local artists and curators split into two-week sections.

Sept. 28, 2016 by Maria Egolf-Romero, Alex De Vore

SFR Picks: So Long Sweet Studio

Ron Pokrasso is letting everyone take home a piece of the secrets of Timberwick Studios

Picks Neighboring states, Arizona, Colorado and Utah have significantly fewer unemployeed workers.

SFR Picks: Existential Medicine

“Chimneys fall and lovers blaze/Thought that I was young”

Picks The best thing about a good song is that it can be heartbroken with you, and musician Neko Case makes those kinds of songs; the ones that haunt you so much that they become your go-to for a bad day or a particularly brutal hangover.

Sept. 14, 2016 by Maria Egolf-Romero, Alex De Vore

SFR Picks: Musical Empathy

Jacob Fred Jazz Odyssey rewrites the book on jazz

Picks For the last five years, pianist Brian Haas has quietly lived in Santa Fe. To most people, he’s just a guy, but to fans of psychedelic jazz and experimental music the world over, he’s a founding member of Jacob Fred Jazz Odyssey.

Sept. 07, 2016 by Alex De Vore

SFR Picks: A Bookworm’s Hero

Fantastical paintings inspire literary forays

Picks Mary Alayne Thomas is a champion of books—like, the ones with turnable pages and bound spines. And her upcoming solo exhibit is all about spurring her audience to grab a book.

Aug. 31, 2016 by Maria Egolf-Romero, Alex De Vore

SFR Picks: Reclamation Song

Performing Inuit identity

Picks Tanya Tagaq is an Inuit rock star, in that she brings her traditional sound into contemporary time. She combines musical traditions from her Inuit identity with methods and melodies from punk and metal, creating a species of sound all her own.

Aug. 24, 2016 by Maria Egolf-Romero

Game On: Mafia III Review

Developer Hangar 13 takes the mob south

Pop Culture As far as antiheroes go, Lincoln Clay ranks up there.

Oct. 11, 2016 by Alex De Vore

Cavity Ghosts and Other Delights: The Art of Nico Salazar

A local artist spans eras and influence for a new locally produced clothing line

Pop Culture Who would have guessed that fateful candy craving would be the catalyst for meeting the Cavity Ghost creator himself, artist Nico Salazar. 

Sept. 21, 2016 by Amy Davis

Game On: Bioshock: The Collection Review

The benchmark series comes together forever

Pop Culture As we approach the 10th anniversary of the original Bioshock game, the fine folks at publisher 2K have seen fit to release a remastered collection. 

Sept. 19, 2016 by Alex De Vore

Game On: No Man's Sky Ongoing Review Part II

Days 4-8

Pop Culture Finally off-world, I recharge my warp drive. It took me ages to gather the components to craft the thing, but it will allow me to jump between star systems. 

Aug. 19, 2016 by Alex De Vore

Game On: No Man's Sky Ongoing Review

Days 1 through 3: Scratching the surface of Hello Games' vast interstellar exploration sim

Pop Culture I regained consciousness, but I was confused and alone, the grassy landscape spreading out before me. 

Aug. 11, 2016 by Alex De Vore

Game On: We Happy Few Early Access Pre-Review

Canadian dev Compulsion Games creates a nightmare fit for Orwell

Pop Culture I’m not entirely sure who I am. My job, I know, is to decide what news to distribute to the people; I redact what I must, but I’m beginning to change, I’m beginning to remember. 

Aug. 02, 2016 by Alex De Vore

The Other Side of the Counter

A look at the noncreative side of the comic book industry with Kevin Drennan

Pop Culture Comics shop owner Kevin Drennan is out there curating for you.

July 15, 2016 by Alex De Vore

So High

New adult coloring book aims to de-stress your world

Pop Culture On a recent sunny and blisteringly hot afternoon, the SFR staff sat down at the picnic table behind our offices and set to work on pages from a new adult coloring book.

July 14, 2016 by Alex De Vore

Game On: Resident Evil 5 Remaster Review

Capcom goes for the nostalgia factor yet again

Pop Culture They're not quite zombies, bro. They're victims of a systematically-administered virus test from an evil pharmaceutical corporation. Duh.

July 12, 2016 by Alex De Vore

Sharp Shooters

Instagram photographers run wild at the Santa Fe Opera

Pop Culture “Am I breaking the rules?” asks Amy Tischler. She has strayed into the center of a workshop in the Santa Fe Opera’s brand-new props department. 

July 11, 2016 by Jordan Eddy

Santa Fe Performing Arts Names New Executive Artistic Director

Local actor/musician and Meow Wolf co-founder Megan Burns to take the reigns of the local theater company this month

Theater & Stage Reviews Meow Wolf co-founder to take over the executive artistic director position at Santa Fe Performing Arts at the end of September.

Sept. 09, 2016 by Maria Egolf-Romero

A Midsummer’s Midsummer

Side notes on a well-known Shakespearean comedy

Theater & Stage Reviews As a side note and perhaps to explain his decision to let his actors use their own voices in the Santa Fe Shakespeare Society production of A Midsummer Night’s Dream, director Jerry Ferraccio says t

July 04, 2012 by Matthew Irwin

Picking at the bones of industry

Other People’s Money appeals to hearts and wallets

Theater & Stage Reviews Director Ron Bloomberg leans over to me at a recent rehearsal for the Santa Fe Playhouse production of Other People’s Money, and says, “This is one of the first plays to address vulture capitalism

June 13, 2012 by Matthew Irwin

Company’s out for summer

Dance performance strives to push the boundaries of, well, dance

Theater & Stage Reviews Arcos Dance artistic director Curtis Uhlemann describes the scene for “46 Thousand,” a piece he choreographed with his co-director Erica Gionfriddo: The scaffolds are black, the dancers wear black (their hair down) and musician Andy Primm sits above them with his drum kit, playing a piece inspired by the John Bonham solo “Bonzo’s Montreux.”

June 06, 2012 by Matthew Irwin

The Performance Community

The Peñasco Theatre builds community on the High Road

Theater & Stage Reviews From the street-side of The Peñasco Theatre, where a folksy mural tells of people building their community together, the theatre’s owner Alessandra Ogren walks me to the north side of the building where a new mural by Rebeka Tarín and Amaryllis de Jesus Moleski offers a meta-response to images on the front, mixing folk iconography with urban-contemporary references.

May 30, 2012 by Matthew Irwin

Love Rocks

Musical reintroduces the anarchist Emma Goldman

Theater & Stage Reviews Love & Emma Goldman: A Rock Opera is about the enduring human voice. The original production by Sarah-Jane Moody and Jeremy Bleich (aka the experimental pop duo GoGoSnapRadio) is also about taking action for one’s beliefs. It’s about violence, justice, freedom and love. It’s about Emma Goldman, the turn-of-the-century anarchist who spoke up, was deported and disappeared into history.

May 16, 2012 by Matthew Irwin

Chasing Fortune

The absurdity of just pursuits in Teatro Paraguas’ Fortunato

Theater & Stage Reviews The cast is rehearsing the last scene of Fortunato when I arrive at Teatro Paraguas’ new location, a few units down from its old black-box space in the Agua Fría Village. They’re having trouble finding momentum. Lines are forgotten. Props are dropped. Cues are missed. And the scene comes to a halt when actor Marcos Maez leans against a giant target, only to have it collapse behind him with a rattling crash and the sound of glass breaking.

April 25, 2012 by Matthew Irwin

Oil and Water

Nonparticipatory resistance against corporate domination

Theater & Stage Reviews I caused the 2010 BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. This is my conclusion after speaking with Argos MacCallum of Teatro Paraguas about the company’s reading of The Way of Water, Caridad Svich’s play about four people affected by said disaster.

April 18, 2012 by Matthew Irwin

Worlds Within Words

Theaterwork realizes the works and lives of four women poets

Theater & Stage Reviews David Olson’s mother and grandmother were poets. At dinner, Olson’s father, a Swedish immigrant, would leave a line of poetry under a dinner plate for Olson or one of his siblings to discover and

Feb. 14, 2012 by Matthew Irwin

Contemporaneous Celebrations

Wake up and happy birthday, music scene!

Theater & Stage Reviews Santa Fe’s contemporary music scene awakens from semi-hibernation with two important concerts this week. And they’re all about anniversaries.

June 21, 2011 by John Stege

This Weekend

Gotta Get Down on Friday

Weekend Picks And so another week comes to an end, and with it the promise of partying all sick is born anew. We think you can use it as a way to practice for the upcoming Halloween madness ... or maybe we just think partying is cool. Either way, here's some ideas for keepin' it real—we even threw in some stuff for your kids.

Oct. 21, 2016 by SFR

This Weekend

Let's Get Cultural, Cultural

Weekend Picks There are plenty of arts and culture events to keep you busy til Monday.

Oct. 14, 2016 by SFR

This Weekend

T.G.I-Eff Yeah!

Weekend Picks We made it, you guys! The weekend!

Oct. 07, 2016 by SFR

This Weekend

The Days of Our Lives

Weekend Picks Calendar pages keep on flippin' like in some kind of movie that wants to express a rapid progression of time, and you keep on hittin' them streets ready to learn, party, dance, sing and so forth. Here comes your weekend, y'all—and it's a good one.

Sept. 30, 2016 by SFR

This Weekend

Fests on Fests on Fests

Weekend Picks The local lineup of arts and culture festivals continues in various locations across town and everyone is just like, "Dang, we've got a lot of festivals around here!" You can also find music, film, poetry and art pretty much anyplace you look—let's go exploring.

Sept. 23, 2016 by SFR

This Weekend


Weekend Picks The AHA Festival of Progressive Arts takes over multiple locations across town this weekend, and even if that weren't enough (which it totally is), there are plenty of other arts and culture events to keep you busy til Monday. Good thing they're all right here at your fingertips.

Sept. 16, 2016 by SFR

This Weekend

!Que Viva!

Weekend Picks Oh sure, Zozobra has already burned and your subsequent hangover almost killed you, but it's time to suck it up and familiarize yourself with the actual history (and the humor) of the annual celebration.

Sept. 09, 2016 by SFR

This Weekend

Fall into fall, y'all

Weekend Picks We pushed it back as far as we could, but you can feel it with every closed window and every somehow perfectly-spherical hail pellet that hits your car. No matter, though, simply bust out your hoodie, pre-order your pumpkins and continue going out all the time before the winter-time sadsies take hold and you're forced deeper and deeper into your comforters and quilts.

Sept. 02, 2016 by SFR

This Weekend


Weekend Picks It's time to let loose and get down with the best of Santa Fe culture. Catch a show, see some art, theater it up—there's a little something for everyone, whatever their poison may be.

Aug. 26, 2016 by SFR

This Weekend

To feel fall approach but still love partying.

Weekend Picks Somewhere underneath the last grasp of warmth you can feel the slight chill of impending fall. If it helps, there are art markets, films, music events and art openings galore to ease the sting. These are just a few.

Aug. 19, 2016 by SFR

Morning Word: Martinez Vetoes Education Funding Cuts

Morning Word Governor criticizes lawmakers for cutting her teacher merit pay program and stipends for teachers in difficult-to-staff districts. ... More

Oct. 25, 2016 by Peter St. Cyr


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