Aug. 30, 2015

3 Questions

with Gerry Cerf

3 Questions Dedicated to providing market opportunities for New Mexico women, Women Incorporated is set to take over the Museum of International Folk Art on Saturday and Sunday.

Aug. 26, 2015 by Enrique Limón

3 Questions

with Amber-Dawn Bear Robe

3 Questions Amber-Dawn Bear Robe is the curator of the Indian Market Native Haute Couture Fashion Show at 1 pm Saturday in Cathedral Park.

Aug. 19, 2015 by Julie Ann Grimm

3 Questions

with Ethan Bach

3 Questions In Bodhi Life: A Transgender New Media Artist’s Digital Memoir, Ethan Bach, who splits his time between Santa Fe and Denver, explores his own identity in the form of a digital chronicle some 30 years in the making.

Aug. 12, 2015 by Enrique Limón

3 Questions

with Madame Marie Antoinette Du Barry

3 Questions Just as the French are glad to die for love, local drag fixture Madame Du Barry, the subject of a recent LA Times profile, will be elated to entertain those in attendance at this Friday’s Drenched in Diamonds.

Aug. 05, 2015 by Enrique Limón

3 Questions

with Lindsay Rose

3 Questions Lindsay Rose, 33, is a licensed professional counselor who’s also working on a documentary about teenage drug addiction.

July 29, 2015 by Julie Ann Grimm

3 Questions

with Darryl Lorenzo Wellington

3 Questions On Saturday, the Cut+Paste Society and New Mexico Literary Arts present Writing as Medicine, a summer series that focuses on issues of race, trauma and healing.

July 22, 2015 by Enrique Limón

3 Questions

with Janet Dees

3 Questions Janet Dees has been keeping busy. As co-curator for the latest installment of SITE Santa Fe’s latest 20 Years/20 Shows and the sole curator for Unsuspected Possibilities, her cultural cup runneth over.

July 15, 2015 by Enrique Limón

3 Questions

with Aimée Barry Broustra

3 Questions “We’re Native Americans, that’s who we are. We don’t need to pretend to be something we’re not,” one subject in director Aimée Barry Broustra’s The Young Ancestors says.

July 08, 2015 by Enrique Limón

3 Questions

with Luis Sánchez Saturno

3 Questions Taking a departure from the daily grind and focusing on his artist side, Santa Fe New Mexican photographer Luis Sánchez Saturno presents Creative Spark this Friday at Roland van Loon Gallery.

July 01, 2015 by Enrique Limón

3 Questions

with Richard Bell

3 Questions Founded in 1993 with the intention “to educate, engage, encourage and celebrate LGBT inclusion, pride and acceptance for all people,” Santa Fe’s Human Rights Alliance is steady in its efforts to build lasting relationships with civil rights groups across New Mexico.

June 24, 2015 by Enrique Limón

Let It Melo

Fiesta Melodrama combines farce and murder mystery

Art Features Fiesta season is upon us, and with it comes the annual Fiesta Melodrama, which has been presented at the Santa Fe Playhouse for give or take a century.

Aug. 26, 2015 by Emmaly Wiederholt

Painting a View Past Prison Walls

Leonard Peltier turned to art as an escape; now his son is trying to use it to open prison doors

Art Features Somewhere in the 40 years Leonard Peltier has been serving two consecutive life sentences in a maximum security prison for a crime he still says he didn’t commit, he found his way to paint and a canvas.

Aug. 19, 2015 by Elizabeth Miller

A Fire that Burns

Mabel Dodge Luhan finds her way back to center stage

Art Features Mabel Dodge Luhan was a woman worth reckoning. The heiress of an East Coast banker, she was groomed to be well-married, which is exactly what she did—four times.

July 29, 2015 by Emmaly Wiederholt

I Don’t Want Change, I Want Swiss Cheese!

Ironweed takes on the American Dream

Art Features Few playwrights have captured the extremes by which Americans define themselves through success as Arthur Miller did in Death of a Salesman.

July 15, 2015 by Emmaly Wiederholt

…Or Bust

Workshop allows women to bust out with confidence

Art Features For the past 11 years, Wise Fool New Mexico has produced Bust—an annual workshop and performance in which women of all ages, backgrounds and abilities come together for a six-week course designed to build circus prowess and encourage empowerment.

June 24, 2015 by Emmaly Wiederholt

Say Hello to Pacino in Santa Fe

The acclaimed actor will present a special Salome-inspired program at CCA

Art Features “We’re excited to explore Salome with the opera, because what they do up there is incredible,” the Cinematheque’s Jason Silverman tells SFR. “The fact that Pacino has made himself into one of the great Salome experts, made it really exciting to have him come here.”

June 22, 2015 by Enrique Limón

Of Fiddles, Fathers and Families

Fiddler dawns anew

Art Features Few productions have secured as special a place in the annals of musical history as Fiddler on the Roof.

June 17, 2015 by Emmaly Wiederholt

Six Plays, One Bench

Local playwrights, local actors highlight latest version of BenchWarmers

Art Features Now in its 14th year, Santa Fe Playhouse’s BenchWarmers—the city’s longest running one-act festival in which all plays are 15 minutes in length and take place on a bench—has become a time-honored tradition in the local theater community.

June 10, 2015 by Emmaly Wiederholt

It’s Curtains for Grendle

The Screen’s longtime manager steps down, makes move to Violet Crown

Art Features After nearly nine years at its helm, The Screen’s credits will roll on theater manager Peter Grendle as he leaves the post to take on the job of general manager at the Railyard’s new Violet Crown Cinema.

May 28, 2015 by Enrique Limón

Zia Singers Ring in Spring

Make way for Come Rain or Come Shine

Art Features Here in Santa Fe, the weather is a bragging point; we take pride in the ridiculous number of sunny days we enjoy each year, and yet, the lack of precipitation is a constant point of anxiety.

May 06, 2015 by Emmaly Wiederholt

Violet Crown Cinema Ready for its Close-Up

Santa Fe spin-off of the Austin-based cinema set for April 30 opening

Arts After much hullabaloo, the 11-screen Violet Crown Theaters are set to open the doors of the brand-new Railyard space on April 30. This after a private VIP reception scheduled for later this week.

March 30, 2015 by Enrique Limón

Ugly Sweaters & Season’s Greetings!

These are a few of our favorite knits

Arts Last Friday, SFR staffers donned their holiday worst, gorged on gingerbread everything and chugged spiked punch as if the world was about to end.

Dec. 17, 2014 by SFR

Skull Candy

Where to celebrate Día de los Muertos in style

Arts Día de Los Muertos is a vibrant celebration that brings people together every year to memorialize the lives of those who have passed. This weekend, two of the city’s biggest cultural centers offer activities, music and food to celebrate the holiday.

Oct. 31, 2014 by Luke Henley

Where the Action's At

Where the Action's At: Today's the last day to catch the SFFF

Arts World renowned writer of the Game of Thrones series and Jean Cocteau Cinema owner, George RR Martin, leans against one of the rows of seats in his theater as a mob of actors, producers, critics...

May 04, 2014 by JP Stupfel

Flick Fest Underway

Santa Fe Film Festival continues through Sunday

Arts The Santa Fe Film Festival is set to run through Sunday with movies showing at the Jean Cocteau and CCA theaters.

May 02, 2014 by JP Stupfel

Second to None

SFAI program enlightens, two-and-a-half minutes at a time

Arts The Santa Fe Art Institute gathers a small fraction of artists-in-residence every quarter, and asks them to speak about their work.

March 25, 2014 by Zoe Haskell

Summer’s Ending

With another lurking in the wings

Arts When Charles MacKay, general director of the Santa Fe Opera, stepped into the spotlight Aug. 19 just before the final La donna del lago of the season, the audience gasped a collective uh-oh. Who’d cancelled? Anxiety filled the house...

Aug. 27, 2013 by John Stege

Robert Who?

Plus that avid uxoricide Gesualdo’s maddening madrigals

Arts “Well. I think they must have just about run out of Schumann.” And so went an overheard comment at the Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival’s Aug. 15 evening concert. The occasion? Number three of four concerts billed as “Years of Wonder,” each featuring Gesualdo madrigals, Mozart piano trios and, need you ask, chamber works by Robert Schumann.

Aug. 20, 2013 by John Stege

Oscar’s Fatal Attraction

A messy night at the Opera

Arts It was, for sure, Oscar Night out at the Santa Fe Opera last Saturday, e.g., the world premiere of Theodore Morrison’s anticipated work depicting Oscar Wilde’s last years..

July 30, 2013 by John Stege

Violetta Revisited

And a sweet start for ChamberFest ‘13

Arts Finally I get it. Five years ago I denounced Laurent Pelly’s staging of Verdi’s La traviata for the Santa Fe Opera as “spectacularly inept.”

July 23, 2013 by John Stege

Frank Buffalo Hyde

Arts Valve Onondaga/Nez Perce artist Frank Buffalo Hyde (b. 1974) sees Hollywood and the fashion industry’s attempts at appropriation and raises them.

Aug. 19, 2015 by Enrique Limón

Meryl McMaster

Arts Valve A Plains Cree member of the Siksika Nation who is also of European descent, the 27-year-old explored the topic of identity early on, along with perception, memory and myth.

Aug. 19, 2015 by Enrique Limón

Santiago X

Arts Valve A couple of years back, I became familiar with the art of Santiago X, which can best be described as equal parts transgressive and tongue-in-cheek.

Aug. 19, 2015 by Enrique Limón

Teri Greeves

Arts Valve Stackable plastic drawers filled with her “stash”—beads in every hue known to man—dominate the studio of Teri Greeves (b. 1970).

Aug. 19, 2015 by Enrique Limón

Jaque Fragua

Arts Valve “Jaque is passionate and can express his aims with his mural far better than I could,” Shepard Fairey says of one of Jaque Fragua’s monumental pieces.

Aug. 19, 2015 by Enrique Limón

Shan Goshorn

Arts Valve “Meticulous” doesn’t even begin to describe the work of Shan Goshorn (b. 1957). Rooted in advocacy, education and activism, the Eastern Band of Cherokee artist’s double-woven works tell a complex story of oppression, redemption and survival.

Aug. 19, 2015 by Enrique Limón

Steven Paul Judd

Arts Valve Specializing in pieces “for Indians to have, and that gets white people to think,” Kiowa/Choctaw artist Steven Paul Judd draws from the lack of mainstream Native American culture during his childhood and rewrites history.

Aug. 19, 2015 by Enrique Limón

Domina Effect

Enter the uniquely titillating world of Zircus Erotique

Arts Valve Even away from the lights of the stage, the feathers, the pasties and the catcalls, Mena Domina exudes seductiveness.

April 29, 2015 by Enrique Limón

Light On

Outdoor Vision Fest returns for fifth luminous helping

Arts Valve For a full calendar year, students at the Santa Fe University of Art and Design have been beating their brains on how to build upon what has, in four years, become a standout in the local public artscape: Outdoor Vision Fest.

April 22, 2015 by Enrique Limón

Green Eggs and Art

Dr. Seuss-themed exhibit goes Pop

Arts Valve Pop Gallery's OH! A Seussian Tribute is set to unveil on Friday.

March 11, 2015 by Enrique Limón

Press, Released

The Press at the Palace of the Governors kicks off weeklong celebration

Book Reviews Tom Leech, curator of the Press at the Palace of the Governors, is a busy man. “I’ve worked here for 11 years, and I’ve never had two days that were the same,” he says.

Jan. 15, 2013 by Robert Sobel

Absolutely Modern

Local independent bookstores, alive and well

Book Reviews When you come into contact with people who truly love what they do, their energy can be contagious. Such is the case with Nick Potter, owner of Nicholas Potter Bookseller, and Noemi de Bodisco and Sierra Logan of Op.Cit. Books.

Dec. 18, 2012 by Robert Sobel

Boats, Bikes and Blades

A man’s journey around the world

Book Reviews Circumnavigation: Magellan did it in a boat. John Glenn did it in a spaceship. Hell, Phileas Fogg even did it in a hot air balloon in the film Around the World in 80 Days (though, strangely enough, not in the novel on which it was based).

Nov. 13, 2012 by Ryan Collett

Middle of Nowhere

One man’s spiritual journey takes him all the way to Santa Fe

Book Reviews A priest who escaped from Nazi Germany, Father John accepts an assignment to travel to Santa Fe around the time of his grandmother’s death, which symbolizes the loss of everything he knows and loves. However, tragedy is not the focus of Gil Sanchez’ Viva Cristo Rey, and neither is history. Instead, the book offers a sentimental view of the conception of the Cristo Rey Church, the largest adobe structure in the northern hemisphere.

May 23, 2012 by Jackson Larson, Matthew Irwin

Freud or Fiction?

Cowboys, Crime Novels and the CIA

Book Reviews Michael McGarrity is a former deputy sheriff for Santa Fe County. For the release of his 13th novel, titled Hard Country: A Novel of the Old West, he asked Valerie Plame Wilson, a former CIA Operations Officer and author of Fair Game: My Life as a Spy, My Betrayal by the White House to interview him at Collected Works Bookstore.

May 09, 2012 by Jackson Larson

A New Home in Imagination

Native daughter brings Santa Fe experiences to Holocaust tale

Book Reviews Ramona Ausubel has found a way to let a story breathe while also giving great specificity to language—a rare trait among new authors.

Feb. 28, 2012 by Sara Malinowski

The Swedish West

Beautifully designed, photographed, written book misses opportunity

Book Reviews Promising to discover how people really live in our nation’s highly symbolic, deeply mythologized frontier, two Swedes venture to the American West with pen and camera.

Jan. 31, 2012 by Matthew Irwin

Undoing the Myth

Writer-director John Sayles discusses a career on the fringe

Book Reviews Take the US annexation of the Philippines. Around 1898, the US touted itself as an anti-imperialist nation, home of equality, but then it invaded a foreign nation under the auspices of white Christian duty: Save the heathen islanders. This, according to John Sayles, who visits Santa Fe to talk about his work, including the book A Moment in the Sun.

Jan. 17, 2012 by Matthew Irwin

Get off the Lawn

New book looks at the transformation of New Mexico’s plazas

Book Reviews Visit Santa Fe’s Plaza on any Saturday afternoon, and a diverse throng of locals and tourists, buskers and gawkers, buyers and sellers, and artists and lunch-eaters will be milling in and around it.

Nov. 16, 2011 by Hunter Riley

Girly Bits

Eve Ensler brings teen monologues to Santa Fe

Book Reviews In 1998, Eve Ensler published The Vagina Monologues, and suddenly a word that many viewed as vulgar became a powerful—and positive—force. This year’s V-Day performance in Santa Fe—a performance of Ensler’s new collection of monologues, I am an Emotional Creature: The Secret Life of Girls Around the World—benefits the Santa Fe Mountain Center.

Feb. 17, 2010 by Charlotte Jusinski

Calling It a Season

SFCMF says hasta luego

Classical Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival audiences could do the figuring-out for themselves at noon, Aug. 19, at the Lensic when Yefim Bronfman just about tore our heads off with his reading of Prokofiev’s fresh and fierce sonata.

Aug. 26, 2014 by John Stege

SFCMF’s Slow Wind-up

Mostly Mozart, magical Messiaen

Classical As these lazy August days dwindle, peak and pine, Santa Fe music-mavens can’t be faulted for feeling a bit sad that the crazy summer festival scene is nearly finito.

Aug. 20, 2014 by John Stege

The Music Goes Round and Round

Silence and riddles during SFCMF’s fourth week

Classical The other day an old pal recalled a little lecture delivered in this space a few years back. The gist? Will you audiences please, please stop already with those obligatory knee-jerk standing ovations? Save same for the real, rare spine-tingling conce

Aug. 13, 2014 by John Stege

Mostly About the Beethoven

SFCMF at work

Classical Those vigas and latillas and massive corbels in St. Francis Auditorium may still be vibrating after pianist Alessio Bax’s big bow-wow July 29 noon recital. At first glance his program looked a bit peculiar: Rachmaninoff and Mussorgsky

Aug. 05, 2014 by John Stege

Getting Dedicated

SFCMF @42

Classical What more appropriate opening for the Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival’s 42nd season than Robert Schumann’s ecstatic song, “Widmung,” (“Dedication”) as transcribed for piano by Liszt? 

July 29, 2014 by John Stege

Enthusiasm, Thy Name Is Neikrug

Classical Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival’s long-time artistic director, Marc Neikrug, talks about the 2014 season, opening July 20 at St. Francis Auditorium.

July 15, 2014 by John Stege

IFAM Booth & Vendor Locator

2014 Official IFAM Guide

IFAM The Official Guide to IFAM 2014 - Artist and Vendor Booth Map

Aug. 19, 2014 by SFR

IFAM Rocks

New Market courts a younger demographic while still serving everyone

IFAM If you’ve lived around Santa Fe for any real amount of time, it was no doubt surprising to hear that some awesome renegade artists were splintering off from the mega Indian Market to form their own event in the Railyard.

Aug. 18, 2014 by Alex De Vore

Letter From the President

IFAM IFAM is more than just a Market. It is a movement. It was born of a group of artists with a vision. We wanted a show where we could come together to share our stories, our culture, our heritage and our legacies with you.

Aug. 18, 2014 by John Torres Nez

New Kids on the Market Block

Five artists on the rise discuss hopes for their first market experience

IFAM Though some might have been practicing art for most of their lives, this collection of emerging artists talk about what they expect during their first market experience. Come up and see them sometime (at their booth, that is).

Aug. 15, 2014 by Ian MacMillan

Miles To Go Before He Sleeps

Douglas Miles plays by his own set of rules

IFAM San Carlos Apache–Akimel O’odham artist Douglas Miles has so many moving parts, it’s sometimes difficult to keep track of how they all fit together.

Aug. 15, 2014 by Rob DeWalt

Happy Monsters and Other Creatures

Enter the world of Heidi K Brandow

IFAM I am going to ask you a very stereotypical question,” I say. Heidi Brandow nods. “Were you influenced by the skater-surfer culture in Hawaii?” She smiles big, getting the subtle humor.

Aug. 15, 2014 by Bett Williams

A Nifty Fifty-Ninth

A five-star summer

Opera The collective shoulder of the Santa Fe Opera, closing down its 59th season on Saturday, Aug. 29, has borne a few heavy crosses this summer.

Aug. 12, 2015 by John Stege

A Magic Mountain

That’s anything but cold

Opera Perched on its hill north of town, the Santa Fe Opera doesn’t shy away from nouveau.

Aug. 05, 2015 by John Stege

Infinite Finto

Mozart’s troubled school for lovers

Opera Forget Mozart—for now. Instead, be diverted with thoughts of Jerome Kern. Of Oscar Hammerstein II.

July 29, 2015 by John Stege

Salome Agonistes

Featuring tête de prophète vinaigrette

Opera Those three affable Princes of Serendip, patron saints of fortuitous coincidence, made their presence known here last week in a cheer-inducing pair of oddly complementary theatrical events.

July 22, 2015 by John Stege

Voices, Voices, Voices

This Rigoletto’s a contender

Opera Recent music venues here in the City Diff have been promoting those darn melodic earworms that do not go gently.

July 15, 2015 by John Stege

Napoleonic Tomfoolery

Getting regimented at the Opera

Opera Welcome, friends, to Cloud-cuckoo Land. No, stop. That’s that dead Greek guy. Um—Never-never Land? Uh-uh. The late Mr. Barrie dreamed that one up. How about Topsy-turvey-dom? Getting warmer, but no cigar.

July 08, 2015 by John Stege

Flowers, Fillies and Freud

SFO’s 5 for ‘15

Opera Listen up, opera fans: they’re back! Those iconic historic romantic white petunias out at the Santa Fe Opera, that is. Some pesky petunia malady had been blighting those fragrant posies for a while, but as you shall see and smell, it’s A-OK again.

July 01, 2015 by John Stege

SFO ‘14: Not Over Till…

August 23

Opera Sammy Cahn wrote the lyrics, and Ol’ Blue Eyes sang it first: “I’m oh, so glad we met the second time around.” Ergo, herewith another look at this season’s Santa Fe Opera summer offerings. 

Aug. 05, 2014 by John Stege

A Brilliant Sun

Worth the journey

Opera With permission, let me gently misapply the term to the mysterious beginnings of Huang Ruo’s first opera, Dr. Sun Yat-sen, whose American premiere just happened at the Santa Fe Opera.

July 29, 2014 by John Stege

SFO Gets The Bird

A deuce of an evening

Opera Expectations ran high about this new, bright-idea Mozart/Stravinsky pairing, both composers with long-standing connections with the SFO, and both captivating works with the potential to provide another enchanted evening.

July 22, 2014 by John Stege

Forgotten History

Uncovering the legacy of America’s all-black towns

Performing Arts Karla Slocum is an anthropology professor from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, studying the black history of Oklahoma as a local resident scholar at the School for Advanced Research. Think of her as a cross-country vagabond, but with a PhD.

Dec. 11, 2012 by Ryan Collett

Poetic License

Two poets diverge in a yellow wood (read: a local bookstore)

Performing Arts Last Saturday, Collected Works Bookstore hosted the second fall reading series of Muse Times Two, curated by Dana Levin and Carol Moldaw.

Nov. 20, 2012 by Robert Sobel

Like Mike

Yay! Comic Mike Birbiglia sleepwalks into town

Performing Arts With the success of his indie film Sleepwalk with Me, which he co-wrote, directed and stars in, it’s been a whirlwind year for comedian Mike Birbiglia; though he’ll be the first to brush off the “movie star” title. “My agent always tries to knock me down and say I’m not a movie star, but rather a movie starrer—which means I was the star in a movie, but I’m not an actual star,” Birbiglia tells SFR.

Sept. 19, 2012 by Enrique Limón

Children and Fools Speak True

Local theater collective dawns anew

Performing Arts A wise fool, says Devon Ludlow, managing director of Wise Fool New Mexico, is “one of those fabulous names…Jesters being able to speak the truth…idiocy and wisdom melding.” The medieval court jesters often interspersed truths, honest observations and wise words in their otherwise absurd performances.

Sept. 18, 2012 by Mia Rose Carbone

That’s All, Folks!

SFO and SFCMF bid adieu for the season

Performing Arts The acequia running nearby shows a few yellow leaves; too cool for breakfast outside today; the overgrown garden needs a firm hand. Summer is slowing and the summer music scene is finito. An imaginary curtain rang down at the Santa Fe Opera last Saturday night, and the Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival closed up for the year. So now—a little accountability?

Aug. 29, 2012 by John Stege

Tonal Voice

Schoenberg dominates Chamber Music Festival’s final weeks

Performing Arts Take note, please, of a preliminary event at last Sunday’s Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival concert: the sight of a large, black-clad man being tugged through the crowded lobby at the Lensic by a small girl. The child? A determined young daughter. The gentleman? This season’s distinguished artist-in-residence, Alan Gilbert. Her urgent excuse? I didn’t ask.

Aug. 15, 2012 by John Stege

Clarinets of Every Size

Woodwinds shine at Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival

Performing Arts Every time I hear a fine, well-produced contralto voice, I get the chills. Maybe it goes back to my grandmother’s old Schumann-Heink 78s. Kathleen Ferrier’s “Embarme dich,” and anything else s

Aug. 08, 2012 by John Stege

Straussian Function

Arabella continues a rich tradition of German opera in SF

Performing Arts Anyone who’s been hanging around the Santa Fe Opera for any length of time has heard, until quite recently, a really terrific amount of Richard Strauss.

Aug. 01, 2012 by John Stege

Upping the Ante

Chamber Music Festival: manic brillance, rhapsodic climax

Performing Arts Forty years old already? It can’t be that long since I heard several concerts at the Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival’s inaugural season—six Sunday afternoons back in 1973.

Aug. 01, 2012 by John Stege

A Thorough Rogering

The Santa Fe Opera’s King Roger stays focused

Performing Arts Ever since its 1926 premiere in Warsaw, Karol Szymanowski’s King Roger has been one of those conundrums of 20th-century music. Generically speaking, is it an opera? A dramatic oratorio? A morality play? Is it a work of penetrating insight into psycho-sexual complexities or a murky slog through mystico-symbological pretense?

July 25, 2012 by John Stege

Eye on the Prize

Tradition meets sci-fi in Jean Cocteau show

Picks “It’s a game that I grew up playing with my mother and grandmother, so it goes back to childhood years for me,” John Picacio says of the inspiration behind his latest works, encompassed in The Art of Lotería.

Aug. 26, 2015 by Enrique Limón

On the Fence

D Miles Apache unleashes new works

Picks Boasting work from a multiplicity of mediums, from paintings on white picket fences, to skateboard designs, to works on social media, Douglas Miles is a man of many talents.

Aug. 19, 2015 by Nicholas Anderson

Rocky Road?

Every day I’m trufflin’

Picks Hey you guuuys, you want to hear something that’ll make you feel really old? Last June, The Goonies marked its 30th anniversary.

Aug. 12, 2015 by Enrique Limón

Intersected

New exhibit explores Native American traditional/contemporary crossroads

Picks “Why not now?” Peyton Wright owner John Wright Schaefer responds when asked why present The Indigenous Modern Intersection now.

Aug. 05, 2015 by Enrique Limón

Sons of a Gun

Get ready to get metal, Santa Fe

Picks It’s been awhile since Denver-based metal band IAMTHESHOTGUN has played a show in Santa Fe. In fact, it’s been so long that the only remaining member is guitarist Bryan Pelle (the show was in 2009).

July 29, 2015 by Nicholas Anderson

Behold Art’s Eye

Arthur Lopez breaks the mold at Spanish Market

Picks With an artistic roster that includes calavera-inspired mariachis, cholos as animas and a Picasso-influenced Pietà, it’s clear that Art Lopez beats to the beat of his own artisanal drum.

July 22, 2015 by Enrique Limón

Tres Cabrones

Picks Since 1983, there has been one grunge/sludge/pop band that all others—and this includes a healthy number of metal bands—have aspired to emulate.

July 15, 2015 by Alex De Vore

Let’s Do the Time Warp

…again

Picks It’s kind of hard to believe now, but celebrated cult film The Rocky Horror Picture Show was a complete flop when it opened in 1975.

July 08, 2015 by Alex De Vore

Compressed to Impress

Airbrush artist Grant Kosh stages new regular emerging art show

Picks “It really falls back onto iconic pictures, because we’ve seen them so many times that those are the most striking ones,” Grant Kosh told SFR back in January 2013.

July 01, 2015 by Enrique Limón

Pride & True

Picks Past the artifice of body glitter, rainbow-hued tutus and packets of personal lubricant that are flung from the back of semi-decorated trucks, lies a true message.

June 24, 2015 by Enrique Limón

Game of Thrones for Noobs X

Season 5 Finale: "Mother's Mercy"

Pop Culture We finally find Khaleesi, who speaks English to her dragon while he just lies around all lazy on a pile of sun-bleached bones. He’s not about to let her ride him again and cannot convey the importance of naptime strongly enough.

June 15, 2015 by Alex De Vore

Game of Thrones for Noobs IX

Season 5, Episode 9:

Pop Culture For some reason, they drink, but the sister-in-law pours one out for her dead homies in a dazzling display of fuck-Lannisters-ness. 

June 08, 2015 by Alex De Vore

Game of Thrones for Noobs VIII

Season 5, Episode 8: "Hardhome"

Pop Culture The moral is that people who wind up hanging out with dragons should be his friend. “You cannot build a better world alone,” he tells her. And she’s like, “I’ve got dragons, motherfucker!”

June 01, 2015 by Alex De Vore

Game of Thrones for Noobs VII

Season 5, Episode 7: "The Gift"

Pop Culture Back at the Wall, the showrunners continue to set back feminism a hundred years by hinting at what might be another rape, but the pudgy guy appears to save this poor girl who is being attacked by two losers.

May 25, 2015 by Alex De Vore

Game of Thrones for Noobs VI

Season 5, Episode 6: "Unbowed, Unbent, Unbroken"

Pop Culture Finally we’re given an idea as to what Arya Stark has been up to inside the House of Black and White—more corpse washin’.  

May 18, 2015 by Alex De Vore

Game of Thrones for Noobs V

Season 5, Episode 5: "Kill the Boy"

Pop Culture Is this dude’s mom named Walda? Like, as in the female version of Waldo? 

May 11, 2015 by Alex De Vore

Game of Thrones for Noobs IV

Season 5 Episode 4: “Sons of the Harpy”

Pop Culture The honeymoon is over for Margaery and the new boy king, as it would seem her brother is in jail and she wants him out, and the king just wants to eat his damn cereal.

May 04, 2015 by Alex De Vore

Game of Thrones for Noobs III

Season 5 Episode 3: "High Sparrow"

Pop Culture The Story Thus Far: Throats were slashed while Arya Stark sailed to the land of needlessly dickish shape-shifters and was eventually allowed into the House of Black and White, whatever that is.

April 27, 2015 by Alex De Vore

Game of Thrones for Noobs II

Season 5, Episode 2 review: "The House of Black and White"

Pop Culture Welcome back to another Game of Thrones review. Be aware that spoilers are ahead but that I also have no fucking clue about what the hell is going on.

April 20, 2015 by Alex De Vore

Game of Thrones for Noobs

Season 5, Episode 1: “The Wars to Come”

Pop Culture What about those of us who never read the books or watched the show before now because we had other things going on (read, there are those of us who, anytime a bazillion people say something is amazing, adopt this, “There’s no fucking way it’s that good!” attitude)?

April 13, 2015 by Alex De Vore

A Midsummer’s Midsummer

Side notes on a well-known Shakespearean comedy

Theater & Stage Reviews As a side note and perhaps to explain his decision to let his actors use their own voices in the Santa Fe Shakespeare Society production of A Midsummer Night’s Dream, director Jerry Ferraccio says t

July 04, 2012 by Matthew Irwin

Picking at the bones of industry

Other People’s Money appeals to hearts and wallets

Theater & Stage Reviews Director Ron Bloomberg leans over to me at a recent rehearsal for the Santa Fe Playhouse production of Other People’s Money, and says, “This is one of the first plays to address vulture capitalism

June 13, 2012 by Matthew Irwin

Company’s out for summer

Dance performance strives to push the boundaries of, well, dance

Theater & Stage Reviews Arcos Dance artistic director Curtis Uhlemann describes the scene for “46 Thousand,” a piece he choreographed with his co-director Erica Gionfriddo: The scaffolds are black, the dancers wear black (their hair down) and musician Andy Primm sits above them with his drum kit, playing a piece inspired by the John Bonham solo “Bonzo’s Montreux.”

June 06, 2012 by Matthew Irwin

The Performance Community

The Peñasco Theatre builds community on the High Road

Theater & Stage Reviews From the street-side of The Peñasco Theatre, where a folksy mural tells of people building their community together, the theatre’s owner Alessandra Ogren walks me to the north side of the building where a new mural by Rebeka Tarín and Amaryllis de Jesus Moleski offers a meta-response to images on the front, mixing folk iconography with urban-contemporary references.

May 30, 2012 by Matthew Irwin

Love Rocks

Musical reintroduces the anarchist Emma Goldman

Theater & Stage Reviews Love & Emma Goldman: A Rock Opera is about the enduring human voice. The original production by Sarah-Jane Moody and Jeremy Bleich (aka the experimental pop duo GoGoSnapRadio) is also about taking action for one’s beliefs. It’s about violence, justice, freedom and love. It’s about Emma Goldman, the turn-of-the-century anarchist who spoke up, was deported and disappeared into history.

May 16, 2012 by Matthew Irwin

Chasing Fortune

The absurdity of just pursuits in Teatro Paraguas’ Fortunato

Theater & Stage Reviews The cast is rehearsing the last scene of Fortunato when I arrive at Teatro Paraguas’ new location, a few units down from its old black-box space in the Agua Fría Village. They’re having trouble finding momentum. Lines are forgotten. Props are dropped. Cues are missed. And the scene comes to a halt when actor Marcos Maez leans against a giant target, only to have it collapse behind him with a rattling crash and the sound of glass breaking.

April 25, 2012 by Matthew Irwin

Oil and Water

Nonparticipatory resistance against corporate domination

Theater & Stage Reviews I caused the 2010 BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. This is my conclusion after speaking with Argos MacCallum of Teatro Paraguas about the company’s reading of The Way of Water, Caridad Svich’s play about four people affected by said disaster.

April 18, 2012 by Matthew Irwin

Worlds Within Words

Theaterwork realizes the works and lives of four women poets

Theater & Stage Reviews David Olson’s mother and grandmother were poets. At dinner, Olson’s father, a Swedish immigrant, would leave a line of poetry under a dinner plate for Olson or one of his siblings to discover and

Feb. 14, 2012 by Matthew Irwin

Contemporaneous Celebrations

Wake up and happy birthday, music scene!

Theater & Stage Reviews Santa Fe’s contemporary music scene awakens from semi-hibernation with two important concerts this week. And they’re all about anniversaries.

June 21, 2011 by John Stege

Through the Lens

Lensic affiliates share their views

Theater & Stage Reviews The Lensic theater space turns 80 this year and simultaneously celebrates 10 years since it became the nonprofit Lensic Performing Arts Center. The Lensic marks this milestone with the same varied arsenal of events it has wielded throughout its history.

April 13, 2011 by Rani Molla

This Weekend

Celebrate New Orleans with Music

Weekend Picks Pay tribute to NOLA on the 10th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina. Hop on your bike to raise money for MS. Catch Guardians of the Galaxy for the last of the Railyard outdoor movies.

Aug. 28, 2015 by SFR

This Weekend

Fill your weekend with Native American art.

Weekend Picks The 94th Santa Fe Indian Market and IFAM are here. See works from thousands of artists—from traditional to contemporary, music, film, fashion and more.

Aug. 21, 2015 by SFR

This Weekend

Circus arts, puppets and Native American art

Weekend Picks Celebrate contemporary Native American art and jewelry, take in a puppet show or Wise Fool's circus theater and cap the weekend off with some Mozart.

Aug. 14, 2015 by SFR

This Weekend

Make art, see art, be art.

Weekend Picks Take part in Axle Contemporary's latest art project, get your sketch on at Midsummer Muse and peruse the creations of Santa Fe's young artists.

Aug. 07, 2015 by SFR

This Weekend

Celebrate the Best of Santa Fe!

Weekend Picks Don't miss our Best of Santa Fe party with the vendors and artists that you voted for! Also Girls Inc.'s annual craft show, live music, classic movies and more.

July 31, 2015 by SFR

This Weekend

Spanish Market is here!

Weekend Picks It's the 64th Annual Traditional Spanish Market this weekend. Also there's live music, art openings and cookbook readings.

July 24, 2015 by SFR

This Weekend

Take in some art and live music.

Weekend Picks Check out works from Georgia O'Keeffe, Arthur Dove, John Marin and more. Also don't miss Nacha Mendez and Death of a Salesman.

July 17, 2015 by SFR

This Weekend

The International Folk Art Market is back!

Weekend Picks The 12th Annual International Folk Art Market is back, as well as ART Santa Fe. Also celebrate Women in Film and catch The Act of Killing.

July 10, 2015 by SFR

This Weekend

Happy birthday, America!

Weekend Picks Celebrate our country's 239th birthday this weekend. (You don't look a day over 200, America!) There's live music, pancakes and more!

July 03, 2015 by SFR

This Weekend

Celebrate Pride!

Weekend Picks It's a historic weekend to celebrate love! Don't miss the Santa Fe Pride Parade, dancing, drag shows and more.

June 26, 2015 by SFR
 

This Week's SFR Picks

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